Fraud In The Holiday Season Do Not Be A Victim 

By | June 16, 2018

Fraud In The Holiday Season. We come nearly full circle through another year.  Hope you will have a prosperous one.  During this time of year, so as not to make your year any worse. This article about fraud in the holiday season. To help you become more aware of these seasonal and around the year threats.

This should be the time (throughout the year actually) for us to show appreciation. And rejoice in the blessing that the supreme architect of all there gave to us.  So you don’t want to interrupt it by becoming a victim of fraud.

Affiliate Disclaimer: I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

The unsavory characters and cybercrime trying in many different ways to deceive, steal, dupe, and victimize us out of your money or steal your identity.

Fraud In The Holiday Season

To get ahead of what is to come, precautions and awareness should be priority number one. Whether you are shopping online or at the mall, here are some scams to look out for and how to avoid.

Holiday scams off the Internet

Scam 1.  Even though this might not take place at the mall per say, it can happen when you are out and about. here is a scam that is used when your card is handled out of your sight:  When at a restaurant a waitress takes your credit card and swipes it through the register.  

Then, they pull out a small device, known as a skimmer, and swipes it through that, says Sergeant David Schultz of the Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office in Texas.

How to avoid  Set up mobile alerts for your phone if your financial institution provides the feature.Fraud this Holiday Season be careful That way, you can be aware of unusual activity as quickly as possible.  Regularly monitor your accounts online, so you can identify fraudulent transactions faster, says Schultz.

Scam 2. Many retailers and manufacturers will hire extra staff for the holiday rush. And when we may be pressed for money we will look for work through these seasonal jobs.  

Spammers send out emails promising non-existing jobs or jobs that may exist. for which, you’ll be asked to pay a commission or fee for the job.

You may see the ads in newspaper classifieds and even flyers or signs posted around town. Don’t pay for a job beforehand. Be wary if it’s a “work now, get paid later” job — check out the employer’s credentials.

Scam 3. Charity scams are just the best time for scammers to tug on our heart.  Most likely place you’ll find them is a rattle collection box in front of you while shopping or at your door.

They’ll use props wearing seasonal costumes, dressed in uniforms, or carrying some bogus authorization. Often too, scammers will use kids to convince you.

How To Avoid It

If you don’t have time to verify the charity then don’t give. If you want to help them, find the charity name and donate directly.  Only donate to charities you know. If a new charity piques your interest, be sure to verify it on charitynavigator.org or through theBetter Business Bureau.

Credit Cards

How Can Someone Steal Your Credit Card While It’s Still in Your Wallet?

Ever wonder how your credit card could have been used to buy cellphones in another state when you just swiped it at your grocery store an hour ago? Credit card fraud generally comes in two forms: in-store fraud and card-not-present fraud.

In the first situation, a thief has your credit card in her hand and uses it as a payment terminal just as you would. In the other scenario, a thief may or may not have a physical card, because all he needs to make an online or over-the-phone transaction is your card number, expiration date and security code (sometimes, he might need your name and billing ZIP code, too).

You’d think you could prevent in-store credit card fraud pretty easily — keep track of the card, and if you happen to misplace it (or your wallet goes missing), cancel it so no one can use it. That’s not always how it works, though.

People who steal electronic credit card data or buy stolen data from the black market can manufacture fake cards and get away with in-store fraud. If your card is in your wallet and you receive a notification from your credit card company saying your card has been fraudulently used in a store, restaurant or other bricks-and-mortar location, that’s probably what happened.

How Thieves Steal Credit Cards

If like most U.S. consumers, you have magnetic stripe credit cards, no one is going to be able to skim your credit card data merely by getting close to you. There’s the possibility you used a gas pump or ATM that has been tampered with.

Moreover, a server at a restaurant you visit may copy your credit card information when they take it away from your table. However, it’s more likely your card will be compromised in one of those massive data breaches you’ve been reading about recently.

With other payment technology, there’s a chance someone can skim your card if they’re close enough to your wallet. Payment methods enabled with near-field communication (NFC) or RFID to work with payment terminals outfitted with proximity reading.

Meaning these cards have the ability to communicate with devices without touching them. Still, there are often measures in place to secure contactless payment, and a skimming device would have to be very close to the card to strip it of its data.

Safeguarding Your Money

Check your account activity daily or set up transactional monitoring with your bank or credit card issuer. You’ll also want to check your credit scores for sudden changes — it could be a sign someone ran up your credit card balance without your permission — and review your free annual credit reports for other kinds of fraud that can be trickier to detect, like identity theft. To get updates on your credit standing, you can see two of your free credit scores every 30 days on Credit.com.

Online Holiday Scams

FAKE WEBSITES 

A type of software that damages or infiltrates a computer or network.  A legitimate website with minimum security is perfect for a malware attack. The malware instantly downloads onto your computer when you visit the site and allows access to your information.

In one scenario, malware is on public computers and it gathers the information you share with that computer, the malware infiltrates the computer system of banks, retailers, and other businesses and extracts personal account information.

1. Popular present scams  

Preying on your desperation to get the hottest holiday presents, scammers set up websites and social media ads advertising fake supply items.fraud3 Instead of mailing the gifts, scammers steal your credit card information.

“Scammers follow the headlines; they know what the hot gift items are and will take advantage of your desire to buy them for Christmas,” says Nicole Vincent, consumer education specialist.  If the deal sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

“If you don’t recognize the [retailer], search the company name with terms like ‘complaint’ and ‘scam’ to see if it’s legitimate,” Vincent advises. “Many times, you’ll see a lot of negative reviews if the company offering the hot gift item is a scammer.”

How To Avoid It

Don’t trust a site or name you don’t know — check them out. Don’t fall for prices that are too good to be true — they usually are. Use a one-time card number available from some credit card companies to protect your financial details.

A type of software that damages or infiltrates a computer or network.  A legitimate website with minimum security is perfect for a malware attack. The malware instantly downloads onto your computer when you visit the site and allows access to your information.

In one scenario, malware is on public computers and gathers the information you share with that computer, the malware infiltrates the computer system of banks, retailers, and other businesses and extracts personal account information.

2. Phishing schemes:

During the holidays, you’ll likely receive multiple e-mails that appear to be from FedEx, UPS or the United States Postal Service (USPS) asking you to fill out forms (including financial details) to have holiday parcels delivered.  

“You can be 100 percent certain that [these] e-mails are not from the Postal Service; it’s not how we communicate with our customers,” notes Margaret Williams, national public information representative for the United States Postal Inspection Service.

If there is a package waiting for you at the post office, USPS will leave a notice in your mailbox; FedEx and UPS will also leave notices at your home.  You may also be receiving phony emails alerting you that the direct deposit payments you were expecting were rejected.

It’s tempting to click on the link and enter financial information to ensure your holiday money lands in your account. But Colleen Morrison, senior director of communications for NACHA, the Electronics Payment Association, warns that it’s a scam.  “Any e-mails that appear to be from NACHA are fraudulent,” she says.

A malware can go after your laptop through sent emails with attachments that promise an enticing bait. When the user opens the attachment, malware instantly downloads onto the computer and leaves confidential information vulnerable.  Also, emails are from a familiar sender with a link to a fraudulent website that installs malware onto your computer.

Gift Cards

3. Gift card cons: The popularity of gift cards — 62 percent of Americans plan to purchase gift cards this season, according to a Consumer Reports’ poll — has con artists coming up with clever ways to take advantage of consumers.  

Counterfeit or fraudulent gift cards are on auction websites; scammers also use stolen credit cards to purchase gift cards and sell them for cash.  Some scammers inflate the value of the gift cards they are selling, duping consumers into spending more than the card is worth.

In fact, The Better Business Bureau logged 440 complaints about empty gift-cards between January 2011 and October 2011, up from just 33 complaints in 2010.  “Be wary about buying gift cards online [from nonretail sites] because you don’t know what you’re getting,” says Greg Daugherty, executive editor of Consumer Reports.

Daugherty suggests purchasing gift cards from reputable retailers. While asking clerks to scan pre-loaded cards to ensure they are still valid and retain their value. Also, keep the receipt in case the recipient has problems with the gift card.

How to avoid it: Don’t trust a site or name you don’t know — check them out. Don’t fall for prices that are too good to be true — they usually are. Use a one-time card number available from some credit card companies to protect your financial details.

BEEN VICTIMIZED?

  • File a police report. Go to your local police station and file a report about the fraud or scam so you can prove to your bank and credit reporting companies you’ve been scammed.
  • Tell your credit card company and bank. If you are the victim of identity theft or some other financial scam, contact the fraud department at your credit card company and bank. You may have to close the account or the institution may just remove the fraudulent transactions.
  • Report the fraud to the three credit reporting companies. Do this as soon as possible, especially if your personal information was used to take out a new credit line, make purchases, take out loans, or anything else that could affect your credit. Each credit reporting company has a fraud unit: Equifax: (800) 525-6285; Experian: (888) EXPERIAN or (888) 397-3742; TransUnion: (800) 680-7289.
  • Gather evidence. In addition to the police report, save what you can relate to the suspected fraud. Having items such as letters/emails of solicitation, prospectuses, canceled checks, cash receipts, receipts for cashier’s checks or money orders, bank statements, investment statements, or medical statements could help you get your money back or protect yourself from further victimization.

CALL THE FRAUD WATCH NETWORK HOTLINE

If you need help, call the Fraud Watch Network Hotline to speak one-on-one with a highly trained AARP volunteer Fraud Fighter. They are standing by to offer peer counseling, support, and referral services to fraud victims and their family members. Call toll-free: 877-908-3360.

I want you to have a great holiday season and avoid holiday scams. So be on guard, pass on the tips to a couple of your friends and family members. — And enjoy a Happy Holiday!

If there is any chance of you starting an online home business. I would like to invite you to join my marketing team now! You will get intense training and all you need to create an online business for free. Furthermore, if you opt-in to become a member, we will teach you how to run your online business at its optimum level. Also as a member, you will have access to all the program offers as shown in my review.

Thanks for stopping by. I wish you all the best with your online business, and, may you have blessings and prosperity. Please, let’s communicate, share a comment or question and I will get back in touch with you.

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About Maurice Jackson

Hello, my name is Maurice Jackson I live and, started my business in Detroit. My intentions are, to help any and every one with affiliate marketing as a home business, become a successful professional. My first career was working for the city of Detroit as an inspector, where I thought I would retire. But life brings change and surprises. I sustained an injury that led to an earlier retirement than I had planned. With that said I reinvented myself in April of 2014 and, became part of an affiliate program. Within the time of my reinvention leading up to the present, I am generating lots of traffic to my website and it grows every day. ROI has been minimal but then again I invested nothing to start. I am at the point of letting my site mature, as I keep writing quality content about it. In this business, you have to pay your dues. Furthermore, I and the rest of our family (become a member and you will see the family side of it) of 109000, including the founders of the program (yes they participate), will see to it that we all will be making a substantial amount of revenue as members

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